Idealink

Icon

Ideas, Linked; Ideals, Inked.

Palin: What Bush doctrine?


Note: If you don’t know what the Bush doctrine is, you’ve been living in the tundra trying to build a bridge to nowhere. Alaska jokes aside, foreign policy matters for the Executive Branch, and being aware of the most important American foreign policy shift in the last 60 years is a little important. From the ABC interview, enough reason not to vote for McCain:

GIBSON: Do you agree with the Bush doctrine?

PALIN: In what respect, Charlie?

GIBSON: The Bush — well, what do you — what do you interpret it to be?

PALIN: His world view.

GIBSON: No, the Bush doctrine, enunciated September 2002, before the Iraq war.

PALIN: I believe that what President Bush has attempted to do is rid this world of Islamic extremism, terrorists who are hell bent on destroying our nation. There have been blunders along the way, though. There have been mistakes made. And with new leadership, and that’s the beauty of American elections, of course, and democracy, is with new leadership comes opportunity to do things better.

Ermmm… This is downright scary. There was a time when Americans respected leaders we could look up to. Now we want them to be average peers. I thought we celebrated the exceptional.

Sarah Palin had ample time to prepare for the interview, which itself was fully managed by the campaign, and lives in, as she says, a state where you can see Russia.

Matt Gonzalez (Green Party) is a more serious VP candidate than Palin. Hilary Clinton would have been, too. If the rule was that McCain needed to get a woman to steal some of the Hilary vote, McCain should have selected Christie Todd Whitman. Then, the question would be whether liberals (and New Jersey) would go to McCain. He would be seen as a maverick by picking a true moderate. And Obama couldn’t simply set up camp in the middle ground and let the Hilary supporters come to him. Instead McCain antagonized half the country, and made the “maverick” moniker a joke.

Oh… The Bush doctrine is the idea of pre-emptive strikes against potential threats. It overturns over 100 years of no war except to defend allies or to respond to attacks. It was used to start the Iraq War.

Advertisements

Filed under: Culture, Philosophy, Politics, , , , , , , , ,

2 Responses

  1. jonolan says:

    Perhaps we’ve seen what harm those elites can and will wreak upon our nation if given even half a chance. It might be good to have someone in high office who wasn’t so divorced from the every day American.

    Besides, most administration and governance is pure common sense, something less than common among the “exceptional.”

    Now, if we were anointing a ruler I’d not be in disagreement with you…

  2. vijtable says:

    Jonolan, maybe you’re right that administration and governance is more common sense. Maybe my reaction was knee-jerk, but Sarah Palin has not impressed me on your criteria either.

    Barring someone who is exceptional, I want someone who has shown common sense in governance or policy positions. She has done neither (for me). Failing that, I want someone who has shown thoughtfulness. She has not. Then, failing all else, I want someone who is knowledgeable.

    My Republican boss is one of those people who, despite being someone with whom I disagree vehemently on some issues, I respect for thinking through her opinions. She also shows basic common sense when it comes to civil liberties.

    It’s not that I have a problem with Republicans. I have a problem with politicians who show no qualifications to lead, including judgment and knowledge. So far (post-2003), McCain has taken leave of his judgment on important swing vote issues, and Palin hasn’t shown any yet. So on the knowledge issue, McCain has the knowledge, but Palin fails there, too.

    As for anointing a ruler, I’m (luckily) a voter. Judging candidates on qualifications to rule is EXACTLY my job. :)

    Note – I freely admit that my point of view skews “left” in the modern American analysis. But in the real world, if the Republicans stood up for what they say they stand for, I’d probably be a Republican.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Archives

Idea(mobile)link

Blog Stats

  • 7,912 hits
Creative Commons License
Idealink by vijtable is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.
Based on a work by various sources, as cited.
%d bloggers like this: